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Effects of Participating in Religious Groups on Mental Health Issues: A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study
Institute of Sports Science, College of Physical Education, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
Institute of Sports Science, College of Physical Education, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Unit of Integrative Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3552-9153
Institute of Sports Science, College of Physical Education, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
2024 (English)In: The international journal for the psychology of religion, ISSN 1050-8619, E-ISSN 1532-7582, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 24-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a Mendelian randomization study to evaluate the potential causal effects of attending religious groups on the prevalence of depression, generalized anxiety disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicide and self-harm. Data from the UK Biobank and the FinnGen project were processed by inverse variance weighting (IVW), weighted median, and MR-Egger regression methods. Despite certain pleiotropic risks, we found that attending religious groups was potentially associated with a reduced risk of anxiety disorders (OR = 0.213, p = .028). The pleiotropies were largely controlled and the effect on anxiety disorders became more significant in our sensitivity analysis (OR = 0.162; p = .006). Additionally, attending religious groups was associated with a reduced risk of suicide and self-harm (OR = 0.231, p = .0006). However, we did not observe any substantial protection against depression. In conclusion, our study adds to the existing literature and sheds light on the potential health benefits of religious activities from a novel perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2024. Vol. 34, no 1, p. 24-36
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Psychiatry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109404DOI: 10.1080/10508619.2023.2267956ISI: 001080739000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85173728230OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-109404DiVA, id: diva2:1807249
Available from: 2023-10-25 Created: 2023-10-25 Last updated: 2024-01-29Bibliographically approved

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