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Boundary work, hybrid practices and portable representations: an analysis of global and national co-productions of Red Lists
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1495-8346
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (centrum för urbana och regionala studier)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6735-0011
2013 (English)In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 30-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For many countries, the IUCN Red List of threatened species is a central instrument in their work to counteract loss of biodiversity. This article analyzes the development of the Red List categories and criteria, how these categories and criteria are used in the construction of global, national, and regional red lists, and how the red lists are employed in policy work. A central finding of the article is that this mix of actors implies many different forms of boundary work. This article also finds that the Red List functions as a portable representation, that is, a context-independent instrument to represent nature. A third finding is that the Red List functions as a link between experts and policy makers. Thus, the Red List is best understood as a boundary object and hybrid practice where the credibility of scientific assessment and a specific policy is mutually strengthened

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berghahn Journals , 2013. Vol. 8, no 1, p. 30-52
Keywords [en]
Portable presentation, hybrid practices, co-production, boundary work, Red List
National Category
Social Sciences Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24146DOI: 10.3167/nc.2013.080103ISI: 000317804900003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84876340533OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-24146DiVA, id: diva2:541535
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasAvailable from: 2012-07-19 Created: 2012-07-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The importance of trust.: a study of knowledge production of biodiversity.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of trust.: a study of knowledge production of biodiversity.
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The loss of biological diversity is one of today’s greatest environmental problems. Scientific knowledge is typically presented as the premise to solve this problem. However, science alone is not sufficient to produce knowledge of biodiversity. Other actors are also involved in knowledge production. The aim of this thesis is to analyse how different actors create knowledge of the environmental problem of biodiversity loss and to further investigate the importance of trust in the relationships between these knowledge producers.

This thesis uses a discourse analytical perspective and conducts interviews and document studies to explore how actors use different narratives to legitimate their knowledge production. Through four papers addressing different aspects of knowledge production, this thesis discusses conditions for knowledge production, particularly the importance of trust.

The results show that actors other than scientific experts also have the ability to act in knowledgeable ways and to be involved in knowledge production of biodiversity. Knowledge is produced by making use of many different dimensions and aspects, such as global, regional, local, and science, politics, and everyday life. The result also shows how trust, distrust, and as-if trust are key activities in knowledge production of environmental problems, such as the loss of biodiversity.

This thesis argues that the actors involved need to realise and acknowledge that knowledge production is a mutual process in which actors must engage in trust and distrust activities. In so doing, it will be possible to understand the complexity of the loss of biodiversity and thus to better manage this problem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2013. p. 94
Series
Örebro Studies in Sociology, ISSN 1650-2531 ; 16
Keywords
trust, knowledge, biological diversity, biodiversity, environmental problems, discourse analysis, Mode-1/Mode-2, SSK, STS
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32291 (URN)978-91-7668-969-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-11-08, Örebro, 21:09 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-11-15 Created: 2013-11-09 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Gustafsson, KarinLidskog, Rolf

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