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Colonization pattern of coagulase-negative staphylococci in preterm neonates and the relation to bacteremia
Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Örebro University. Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
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2010 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1085-1093Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the major cause of sepsis in extreme preterm (EPT) newborns, but data on the CoNS colonization in EPT newborns prior to invasive infection are limited. Our aim was to describe the early establishment of the CoNS microflora in EPT newborns and to compare the colonization pattern in neonates with and without positive CoNS blood cultures. From a cohort of 46 EPT neonates, newborns with positive CoNS blood culture were identified (n = 10) and compared with matched controls. Samples for bacterial cultures were obtained repetitively from nares, perineum, and umbilicus. All CoNS isolates were characterized using the PhenePlate system for biochemical fingerprinting. Persistent CoNS strains were found on day 2-3 after delivery in 7/20 newborns, and there was a tendency for earlier colonization in nares than in the perineum or umbilicus. The CoNS blood strains were prevalent in superficial sites prior to positive blood culture (11/14 blood strains), but no single invasive pathway was identified. Most CoNS blood strains (9/14) persisted on superficial sites after antibiotic treatment. We hypothesize that the invasive pathways in neonatal CoNS sepsis are complex and that the colonization of mucosal membranes and umbilical catheters might be of equal importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2010. Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1085-1093
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25348DOI: 10.1007/s10096-010-0966-3ISI: 000280844500006PubMedID: 20517628Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-78349284429OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-25348DiVA, id: diva2:547123
Note

Funding Agency:

Research committee of Örebro county, Sweden

Available from: 2012-08-27 Created: 2012-08-27 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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Björkqvist, MariaSchollin, JensSöderquist, Bo

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