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Associations between psychological factors and night-time/daytime symptomatology in insomnia
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. (CHAMP)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2059-1621
Psychology Department, Berkeley University, San Francisco, USA.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (CHAMP)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2008-0784
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (CHAMP)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5359-0452
2012 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 21, no Suppl. 1, p. 168-169Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Cognitive models of insomnia underscore cognitive mechanisms as important in the maintenance of insomnia. The aim of this study was to examine psychological factors in insomnia and the association between psychological mechanisms with night-time and daytime symptoms.

Methods: In a cross-sectional examination, participants (n = 2327) from a randomly selected sample of the general population completed a survey on demographic parameters, night-time symptoms, daytime impairment, health outcomes, and psychological factors intended to index five cognitive processes (Harvey, 2002). Excluding those with a sleep disorder other than insomnia, the study sample consisted of 1890 participants.  

Results: Relative to poor and normal sleepers, the insomnia group scored higher on worry, beliefs, physiologic arousal, monitoring/attentional bias, and safety behaviours relative to the other two groups, and the poor sleepers exhibited a similar pattern relative to the normal sleepers. High total wake time was associated with more worry, physiologic arousal, and safety behaviours (26.3% variance), low sleep restoration with more worry, unhelpful beliefs, and monitoring/attentional bias (28.2% variance), and low sleep quality with higher scores on all the psychological mechanisms (35.8% variance). Elevated daytime symptoms were related to more unhelpful beliefs and monitoring/attentional bias (44.3% variance).

Conclusion: The findings show that psychological factors discriminate those with insomnia from those with poor or normal sleep. The results also indicate that psychological factors are linked to insomnia-specific night-time and daytime symptomatology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. Vol. 21, no Suppl. 1, p. 168-169
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-26814ISI: 000307963200391OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-26814DiVA, id: diva2:584439
Conference
21th Congress of the European Sleep Research Society, Paris, France, September 4-8, 2012
Available from: 2013-01-09 Created: 2013-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved

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Jansson-Fröjmark, MarkusNorell-Clarke, AnnikaLinton, Steven J.

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