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Adolescent body mass index and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in relation to colorectal cancer risk
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. (Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics)
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, USA.
Vise andre og tillknytning
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 65, nr 8, s. 1289-1295Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Adult obesity and inflammation have been associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, less is known about how adolescent body mass index (BMI) and inflammation, as measured by erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), relate to CRC risk. We sought to evaluate these associations in a cohort of 239 658 Swedish men who underwent compulsory military enlistment examinations in late adolescence (ages 16-20 years).

Design: At the time of the conscription assessment (1969-1976), height and weight were measured and ESR was assayed. By linkage to the national cancer registry, these conscripts were followed for CRC through 1 January 2010. Over an average of 35 years of follow-up, 885 cases of CRC occurred, including 501 colon cancers and 384 rectal cancers. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted HRs and corresponding 95% CIs.

Results: Compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5 to <25 kg/m(2)) in late adolescence, upper overweight (BMI 27.5 to <30 kg/m(2)) was associated with a 2.08-fold higher risk of CRC (95% CI 1.40 to 3.07) and obesity (BMI 30+ kg/m(2)) was associated with a 2.38-fold higher risk of CRC (95% CI 1.51 to 3.76) (p-trend: <0.001). Male adolescents with ESR (15+ mm/h) had a 63% higher risk of CRC (HR 1.63; 95% CI 1.08 to 2.45) than those with low ESR (<10 mm/h) (p-trend: 0.006). Associations did not significantly differ by anatomic site.

Conclusions: Late-adolescent BMI and inflammation, as measured by ESR, may be independently associated with future CRC risk. Further research is needed to better understand how early-life exposures relate to CRC.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
London, United Kingdom: BMJ Publishing Group , 2016. Vol. 65, nr 8, s. 1289-1295
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Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44822DOI: 10.1136/gutjnl-2014-309007ISI: 000379756700009PubMedID: 25986947Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84980649704OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44822DiVA, id: diva2:816314
Merknad

Funding Agencies:

National Cancer Institute T32 CA 009001

Harvard School of Public Health

Örebro University Strategic Funding

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1

Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-06-03 Laget: 2015-06-03 Sist oppdatert: 2018-09-06bibliografisk kontrollert

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