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Additive Manufacturing and High Speed Machining - Cost comparison of short lead time manufacturing methods
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Saab Dynamics Development, Karlskoga, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3298-502X
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Sch Sci & Technol, Univ Orebro, Orebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1408-2249
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1655-0392
2016 (English)In: 26th CIRP Design Conference, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2016, p. 384-389Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Additive Manufacturing (AM) using Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) allows part with abstract shapes, that otherwise would need costly tooling, to be manufactured with short lead time. In this study AM build time simulations are used to predict series part cost for eight parts that are possible to cut from rod blanks using High Speed Machining (HSM). Results indicate that when the part shape can be cut from rod blanks, AM is more expensive than HSM even for series of one. If post processing machining is added to the printed AM blank part, the cost difference increases further. Finally, the model is used to predict part-cost in series production if print speed increases, if machine cost is reduced or if part mass is reduced as a result of redesign for AM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2016. p. 384-389
Series
Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271 ; 50
Keywords [en]
Additive manufacturing, Powder Bed Fusion, High speed machining, cost, series production, AISI MR
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53931DOI: 10.1016/j.procir.2016.05.049ISI: 000387666600064Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84986576762OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-53931DiVA, id: diva2:1055839
Conference
26th CIRP Design Conference, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, June 15-17, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Some aspects on designing for metal Powder Bed Fusion
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Some aspects on designing for metal Powder Bed Fusion
2017 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Additive Manufacturing (AM) using the Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) is a relatively new manufacturing method that is capable of creating shapes that was previously practically impossible to manufacture. Many think it will revolutionize how manufacturing will be done in the future. This thesis is about some aspects of when and how to Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) when using the PBF method in metal materials. Designing complex shapes is neither easy nor always needed, so when to design for AM is a question with different answers depending on industry or product. The cost versus performance is an important metric in making that selection. How to design for AM can be divided into how to improve performance and how to improve additive manufacturability where how to improve performance once depends on product, company and customer needs. Using advanced part shaping techniques like using Lattices or Topology Optimization (TO) to lower part mass may increase customer value in addition to lowering part cost due to faster part builds and less powder and energy use. Improving PBF manufacturability is then warranted for parts that reach series production, where determining an optimal build direction is key as it affects many properties of PBF parts. Complex shapes which are designed for optimal performance are usually more sensitive to defects which might reduce the expected performance of the part. Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) might be needed to certify a part for dimensional accuracy and internal defects prior use. The licentiate thesis covers some aspects of both when to DfAM and how to DfAM of products destined for series production. It uses design by Lattices and Topology Optimization to reduce mass and looks at the effect on part cost and mass. It also shows effects on geometry translation accuracies from design to AM caused by differences in geometric definitions. Finally it shows the effect on how different NDE methods are capable of detecting defects in additively manufactured parts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2017. p. 80
Series
Örebro Studies in Technology, ISSN 1650-8580 ; 74
Keywords
Additive Manufacturing, AM, DfAM, lattice, Powder Bed Fusion, Topology optimization, Selective Laser Melting, Electron Beam Melting, Design for manufacturability
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62947 (URN)
Presentation
2017-11-29, Örebro universitet, Prismahuset, sal P258, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Hällgren, SebastianPejryd, LarsEkengren, Jens

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