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Dwelling on a successful task: Does how or why influence affect?
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Health and Medical Psychology (CHAMP))ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2718-7402
Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Health and Medical Psychology (CHAMP))
Center for Health and Medical Psychology (CHAMP), School of Law, Psychology, and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Psychopathology, ISSN 2043-8087, E-ISSN 2043-8087, Vol. 9, no 3, article id UNSP 047915Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) has been identified as a key maintaining process of emotional difficulties. However, the consequences of repetitive thinking may depend on whether negative thoughts or feelings are processed in an abstract, evaluative mode, or in a concrete, process-focused mode. In recent years an increasing number of studies has also explored the effect of processing mode in relation to positive events, yielding inconsistent results. So far, the studies using positive material have not examined the interaction between trait rumination and processing mode. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to further explore the effects of abstract vs. concrete mode of processing on positive affect and negative affect in the context of a success task in a sample scoring high on trait rumination. 62 participants were randomly assigned to abstract vs. concrete processing training prior to a success task. The results showed that positive affect increased whereas negative affect and state RNT decreased after the success task in both groups. However, abstract vs. concrete processing did not have an effect on outcome. The findings indicate that processing mode does not influence outcome in the context of a success task.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018. Vol. 9, no 3, article id UNSP 047915
Keywords [en]
Processing mode, Repetitive negative thinking, Positive affect, Negative affect
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53988DOI: 10.5127/jep.047915ISI: 000446859400007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054848903OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-53988DiVA, id: diva2:1056515
Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved

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Flink, IdaBergbom, SofiaCarstens-Söderstrand, JohanTillfors, Maria

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