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Adverse associations between maternal and neonatal cadmium exposure and birth outcomes
School of Public Health/Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
School of Public Health/Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
School of Public Health/Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou, China.
School of Public Health/Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China.
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2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 575, 581-587 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effects of low-level cadmium (Cd) exposure during early life on fetal growth remain unclear. Our aim was to evaluate whether Cd exposure in maternal urine and umbilical cord blood was associated with birth size parameters. A birth cohort study including 1073 mother-newborn pairs was conducted from 2009 to 2010 in an agricultural population in China. Cd concentrations were analyzed in both cord blood and maternal urine. Generalized linear models were performed to determine associations between maternal and neonatal exposure to Cd and birth indicators, including birth weight, length, head circumference and ponderal index. The median (25th to 75th percentile) value of Cd concentration in maternal urine and umbilical cord blood was 0.19 (0.08, 1.00) mug/L and 0.40 (<LOD~0.62) mug/L, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, Cd concentration in cord blood was significantly negatively associated with ponderal index at birth [beta=-0.06g/cm3, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.11, -0.02; p<0.01]. Considering sex difference, significant reduction in ponderal index was only observed in males (beta=-0.06g/cm3, 95%CI: -0.11, -0.02; p<0.01), but not in females (beta=-0.03g/cm3, 95%CI: -0.07, 0.01; p=0.18) (p for interaction term=0.24). Additionally, no significant associations were observed between maternal urinary Cd levels and birth outcomes. Our findings suggest that adverse effects of neonatal exposure to Cd on fetal growth are of considerable public health importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 575, 581-587 p.
Keyword [en]
Cadmium; Birth outcomes; Cord blood; Urine; Newborns
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Epidemiology; Enviromental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54065DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.09.016ISI: 000390373400059PubMedID: 27614860ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84995390552OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54065DiVA: diva2:1057809
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Natural Science Foundation of China NSFC-STINT 8151101192

Joint China-Sweden Mobility Programme of the Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education STINT CH2015-6145

Shanghai Project "3-Year Action" GWIV-27.3

Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved

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