oru.sePublikationer
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Diet and risk of renal cell cancer: a population-based case-control study
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Statistics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States .
1997 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 6, no 4, 215-223 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a few previous studies on diet and renal cell cancer, an inconsistent positive association with meat, milk, and protein and a negative association with vegetable and fruit consumption have been found. Whereas earlier studies have dealt with recent diet only, our study explored the effect of foods consumed both during the usual adult lifetime and 20 years prior to interview. The study included 379 individuals with incident histologically verified renal cell cancer and 350 control subjects residing in eight counties in Sweden between June 1989 and December 1991. Usual adult dietary intake and dietary habits 20 years prior to interview were assessed by a structured face-to-face interview and a self-administered questionnaire, respectively. Odds ratios were estimated through unconditional logistic regression. We have not observed an association of renal cell cancer with milk or total meat consumption per se; however, frequent intake of fried/sauteed meat increased the risk of renal cell cancer by about 60%; frequent consumption of poultry was also associated with an increased risk (P for trend, 0.05). A significantly protective effect on risk of renal cell cancer was observed with increasing consumption of fruit (P for trend, 0.05). When analyzed by smoking status, total fruit and especially citrus fruit consumption among nonsmokers showed an even stronger protective effect; the highest quartiles of total fruit, apple, and citrus fruit consumption entailed a 50-60% reduction in risk of renal cell cancer compared with the lowest quartiles. There was a suggestion of a protective effect of high total vegetable consumption. A protective effect of vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol was also more pronounced in nonsmokers (P for trend, 0.004 and 0.007, respectively). Our study adds to the evidence that diet may have an important role in the etiology of renal cell cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, USA: American Association for Cancer Research , 1997. Vol. 6, no 4, 215-223 p.
Keyword [en]
Aged, Carcinoma, Renal Cell/*epidemiology/etiology/prevention & control, Case-Control Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, *Food Preferences, Fruit, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology/prevention & control, Male, Middle Aged, Nutrition Surveys, Risk, Smoking/adverse effects/epidemiology, Sweden/epidemiology, Vegetables
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48988ISI: A1997WU16100001PubMedID: 9107425ScopusID: 2-s2.0-0030984354ISBN: 1055-9965 (Print) 1055-9965 (Linking)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-48988DiVA: diva2:1061269
Available from: 2017-01-01 Created: 2016-03-06 Last updated: 2017-01-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

PubMedScopusFulltext

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindblad, Per
In the same journal
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention
Cancer and Oncology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link