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Dietary acrylamide and risk of renal cell cancer
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
2004 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 109, no 5, 774-776 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The detection of acrylamide, classified as a probable human carcinogen, in commonly consumed foods created public health alarm. Thus far, only 2 epidemiologic studies have examined the effect of dietary acrylamide on cancer risk. Presently, we reanalyzed data from a large population-based Swedish case-control study of renal cell cancer. Food frequency data were linked with national food databases on acrylamide content, and daily acrylamide intake was estimated for participants. The risk of renal cell cancer was evaluated for intake of food items with elevated acrylamide levels and for total daily acrylamide dose. Adjusting for potential confounders, there was no evidence that food items with elevated acrylamide, including coffee (OR(highest vs. lowest quartile) = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.4-1.1), crisp breads (OR(highest vs. lowest quartile) = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.6-1.6) and fried potatoes (OR(highest vs. lowest quartile) = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.7-1.7), were associated with a higher risk of renal cell cancer risk. Furthermore, there was no association between estimated daily acrylamide intake through diet and cancer risk (OR(highest vs. lowest quartile) = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.7-1.8; p for trend = 0.8). The results of this study are in line with the 2 previous studies examining dietary acrylamide and suggest there is no association between dietary acrylamide and risk of renal cell cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2004. Vol. 109, no 5, 774-776 p.
Keyword [en]
Acrylamide/administration & dosage/*adverse effects, Adult, Aged, Carcinogens/administration & dosage/*adverse effects, Carcinoma, Renal Cell/*chemically induced/epidemiology, Case-Control Studies, Confidence Intervals, Female, *Food Habits, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms/*chemically induced/epidemiology, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sweden/epidemiology
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48997DOI: 10.1002/ijc.20011ISI: 000220524000021PubMedID: 14999788ScopusID: 2-s2.0-1642501186ISBN: 0020-7136 (Print) 0020-7136 (Linking) OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-48997DiVA: diva2:1061276
Available from: 2017-01-01 Created: 2016-03-06 Last updated: 2017-01-13Bibliographically approved

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