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International renal-cell cancer study. I. Tobacco use
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Etiology, Bethesda, Maryland, United States; International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland, United States .
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit, New South Wales Cancer Council, Kings Cross, Australia.
Show others and affiliations
1995 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 60, no 2, 194-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between renal-cell cancer (RCC) and tobacco use was investigated in an international, multicenter, population-based case-control study. Coordinated studies were conducted in Australia, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and the United States using a shared protocol and questionnaire. A total of 1,732 cases (1,050 men, 682 women) and 2,309 controls (1,429 men, 880 women) were interviewed for the study. No association was observed between risk and use of cigars, pipes or smokeless tobacco. A statistically significant association was observed for cigarette smoking, with current smokers having a 40% increase in risk [relative risk (RR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.7]. Risk increased with intensity (number of cigarettes) and duration (years smoked). Among current smokers the RR for pack-years rose from 1.1 (95% CI 0.8-1.5) for < 15.9 pack years to 2.0 (95% CI 1.6-2.7) for > 42 pack years (p for trend < 0.001). Long-term quitters (> 15 years) experienced a reduction in risk of about 15-25% relative to current smokers. Those who started smoking late (> 24 years of age) had about two-thirds the risk of those who started young (< or = 12 years of age). Overall, the findings of this pooled analysis confirm that cigarette smoking is a causal factor in the etiology of RCC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 1995. Vol. 60, no 2, 194-198 p.
Keyword [en]
Adult, Aged, Carcinoma, Renal Cell/*etiology, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms/*etiology, Male, Middle Aged, Risk, Smoking/*adverse effects
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48995DOI: 10.1002/ijc.2910600211ISI: A1995QH51800010PubMedID: 7829215ScopusID: 2-s2.0-0028899948ISBN: 0020-7136 (Print) 0020-7136 (Linking) OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-48995DiVA: diva2:1061277
Available from: 2017-01-01 Created: 2016-03-06 Last updated: 2017-01-13Bibliographically approved

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