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Knowledge, experiences and attitudes of dental and health care personnel in Sweden towards infant dental enucleation
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Public Dental Health Service, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden.
School of Helath Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Dental Research Department, Public Dental Helath Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden .
Department of Nursing Science, University College of Southeast Norway, Drammen, Norway.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Helath Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54271OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54271DiVA: diva2:1061789
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2017-01-03Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Infant Dental Enucleation in Sweden: Perspectives on a Practice among Residents of Eastern African Origin
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infant Dental Enucleation in Sweden: Perspectives on a Practice among Residents of Eastern African Origin
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Infant dental enucleation (IDE) is a practice consisting of the removal of deciduous canine tooth buds in infants. Practiced mainly in Eastern Africa, the purpose is to treat or to prevent bodily symptoms and diseases. IDE can cause both general and oral complications. The occurrence of IDE among Eastern African immigrants in a few European countries has been reported. However, knowledge surrounding the practice in Sweden was poor. The overall aim of this work was to explore IDE in the Swedish context. Four studies were conducted. Paper I presents a review of scientific publications. An overview of IDE was gained, and some knowledge gaps were identified. Paper II describes a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of IDE in small children. Dental records of 1133 children (mean age 4.6 years, SD 1.4) from a multi-ethnic area were studied. Missing deciduous canines without any registered reason were documented. One or more deciduous canines were missing in 21% of the children with known Eastern African origin (n=101), compared to only three children in the rest of the population (n=1032). Six adults of Somali origin were interviewed to explore their experiences and perceptions of IDE (paper III). These experiences and perceptions were categorised in four essentially different ways: an effective and necessary treatment, a disputed tradition, an option to failure and a desperate measure. Their experiences and perceptions were found to be highly influenced by contexts. In the final study (paper IV), the knowledge, experiences and attitudes among dental and health care personnel were examined. Questionnaires were sent to licensed personnel working in emergency departments, midwifery and child health centres, school health services and public dental health services in ten municipalities. Less than 20% had any knowledge of IDE, while 12.5% of the respondents encountering children had seen at least one patient subjected to IDE. Different attitudes were reported between clinical settings regarding responsibilities and possibilities concerning the management and prevention of IDE. From the findings presented in this thesis, it was concluded that there is a need for initiatives to increase awareness of and knowledge on IDE among dental and health care professionals. Legally obligated responsibilities in these professions regarding IDE need to be clarified, and initiatives should include guidelines regarding both the management of IDE and its prevention in Sweden. Educational programmes should also be produced for residents of Eastern African origin to change their perceptions of IDE, and a culturally sensitive approach should be adopted to ensure that such programmes are effective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2017. 92 p.
Series
Örebro Studies in Care Sciences, ISSN 1652-1153 ; 68
Keyword
Infant, Africa, Traditional Medicine, Cuspid, Postoperative Complications, Child Advocacy, Emigrants and Immigrants, Sweden
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53504 (URN)978-91-7529-170-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-02-03, Campus USÖ, hörsal C3, Södra Grev Rosengatan 30, Örebro, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-11-15 Created: 2016-11-15 Last updated: 2017-01-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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