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Quantitative genetic studies of antisocial behaviour
Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London, UK; Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London, UK; Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK.
2008 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 363, no 1503, p. 2519-2527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper will broadly review the currently available twin and adoption data on antisocial behaviour (AB). It is argued that quantitative genetic research can make a significant contribution to further the understanding of how AB develops. Genetically informative study designs are particularly useful for investigating several important questions such as whether: the heritability estimates vary as a function of assessment method or gender; the relative importance of genetic and environmental influences varies for different types of AB; the environmental risk factors are truly environmental; and genetic vulnerability influences susceptibility to environmental risk. While the current data are not yet directly translatable for prevention and treatment programmes, quantitative genetic research has concrete translational potential. Quantitative genetic research can supplement neuroscience research in informing about different subtypes of AB, such as AB coupled with callous-unemotional traits. Quantitative genetic research is also important in advancing the understanding of the mechanisms by which environmental risk operates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: The Royal Society Publishing , 2008. Vol. 363, no 1503, p. 2519-2527
Keywords [en]
Antisocial behaviour, genetic, environmental risk, callous–unemotional
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Evolutionary Biology Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54467DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2008.0037ISI: 000257247000004PubMedID: 18434281OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54467DiVA, id: diva2:1064230
Note

Funding Agencies:

Department of Health

Medical Research Council 

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, Henrik

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