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Genetic contributions to the development of ADHD subtypes from childhood to adolescence
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Women and Child Health, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2006 (English)In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 973-981Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Little is known about how genes influence the development of symptoms included in the DSM-IV subtypes of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from childhood to adolescence. The aim of this study was to examine genetic influences contributing to the development of hyperactive-impulsive symptoms and inattentive symptoms of ADHD from childhood to adolescence.

METHOD: The sample included all 1,480 twin pairs born in Sweden between May 1985 and December 1986. Parents responded to mailed questionnaires on three occasions, when the twins were 8 to 9, 13 to 14, and 16 to 17 years old. The authors used dimensional scales of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention derived from a checklist of items based on the DSM symptoms of ADHD.

RESULTS: Symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity declined with increasing age, whereas there was no decline in symptoms of inattention. Persistent genetic influences explain between 45% and 90% of the total genetic variance in hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention across age. Persistent genetic variance was primarily operating across subtypes, even though persistent subtype-specific influences were also significant.

CONCLUSIONS: The finding of persistent cross-subtype (i.e., combined) and persistent subtype-specific genetic influences (i.e., primarily hyperactive-impulsive and primarily inattentive) are in line with a genetic basis for the DSM-IV classification of ADHD subtypes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006. Vol. 45, no 8, p. 973-981
Keywords [en]
attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; inattention; hyperactivity; longitudinal study; twin study
National Category
Psychology Pediatrics Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology; Pediatrics; Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54512DOI: 10.1097/01.chi.0000222787.57100.d8ISI: 000239290500011PubMedID: 16865040Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33746464878OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54512DiVA, id: diva2:1064296
Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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