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Autism spectrum disorders and autistic like traits: similar etiology in the extreme end and the normal variation.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Research and Development Unit, Swedish Prison and Probation Service, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
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2012 (English)In: Archives of General Psychiatry, ISSN 0003-990X, E-ISSN 1538-3636, Vol. 69, no 1, 46-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been suggested to represent the extreme end of a normal distribution of autistic like traits (ALTs). However, the evidence of this notion is inconclusive.

Objective: To study whether there are similar genetic and/or environmental etiologies behind ASDs and ALTs.

Design: A nationwide twin study.

Participants: Consenting parents of all Swedish twins aged 9 and 12 years, born between July 1, 1992, and December 31, 2001 (n = 19 208), were interviewed by telephone to screen for child psychiatric conditions, including ASDs.

Main outcome measures: Two validated cutoffs for ASDs, 2 cutoffs encompassing the normal variation, and 1 continuous measure of ALTs were used with DeFries-Fulker extreme-end analyses and standard twin study methods.

Results: We discerned a strong correlation between the 4 cutoffs and the full variation of ALTs. The correlation was primarily affected by genes. We also found that the heritability for the 4 cutoffs was similar.

Conclusion: We demonstrate an etiological similarity between ASDs and ALTs in the normal variation and, with results from previous studies, our data suggest that ASDs and ALTs are etiologically linked.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chicago, USA: American Medical Association , 2012. Vol. 69, no 1, 46-52 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54514DOI: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.144ISI: 000298675700006PubMedID: 22213788Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84855331271OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54514DiVA: diva2:1064300
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:Swedish Council for Working Life Research Council of the Swedish National Alcohol Monopoly 

Archives of General Psychiatry ended 2012

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-03-07Bibliographically approved

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