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Internalizing behavior in adolescent girls affects parental emotional overinvolvement: a cross-lagged twin study
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
2011 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 223-233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine the direction and the etiology of the association between different parenting styles (parental emotional overinvolvement [EOI] and parental criticism) and internalizing behavior from adolescence to early adulthood. A longitudinal genetically informative cross-lagged design was applied to a population-based sample of Swedish twins contacted at age 16-17 (n = 2369) and at age 19-20 (n = 1705). Sex-limitation modelling revealed different effects for boys and girls. For girls, genetic influences on internalizing problems at age 16-17 independently explained 2.7% of the heritability in parental EOI at age 19-20. These results suggest that emotionally overinvolved and self-sacrificing parental behavior stems in part from daughters (but not sons) genetic predisposition for internalizing behavior. These findings highlight the importance of genetically influenced child-driven effects underlying the parenting-internalizing association, and clarify that the role of such effects may differ depending on sex, type of parenting and developmental period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Springer, 2011. Vol. 41, no 2, p. 223-233
Keywords [en]
Internalizing behavior, parenting, sex-differences, longitudinal, genetics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychology Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54524DOI: 10.1007/s10519-010-9383-8ISI: 000287749700006PubMedID: 20680431Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79952455938OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54524DiVA, id: diva2:1064315
Funder
The Swedish Brain FoundationSwedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research 

Karolinska Institutet center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved

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