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A twin study of autism symptoms in Sweden
Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, London, UK.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgren’s Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2011 (English)In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 16, no 10, 1039-1047 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to identify empirically the number of factors underlying autism symptoms-social impairments, communication impairments, and restricted repetitive behaviors and interests-when assessed in a general population sample. It also investigated to what extent these autism symptoms are caused by the same or different genetic and environmental influences. Autistic symptoms were assessed in a population-based twin cohort of >12,000 (9- and 12-year-old) children by parental interviews. Confirmatory factor analyses, principal component analyses and multivariate structural equation model fitting were carried out. A multiple factor solution was suggested, with nearly all analyses pointing to a three-factor model for both boys and girls and at both ages. A common pathway twin model fit the data best, which showed that there were some underlying common genetic and environmental influences across the different autism dimensions, but also significant specific genetic effects on each symptom type. These results suggest that the autism triad consists of three partly independent dimensions when assessed in the general population, and that these different autism symptoms, to a considerable extent, have partly separate genetic influences. These findings may explain the large number of children who do not meet current criteria for autism but who show some autism symptoms. Molecular genetic research may benefit from taking a symptom-specific approach to finding genes associated with autism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Nature Publishing Group, 2011. Vol. 16, no 10, 1039-1047 p.
Keyword [en]
Autism, triad, twin behavior, genetics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry Neurosciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54529DOI: 10.1038/mp.2010.82ISI: 000295214800006PubMedID: 20644553Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80053133322OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54529DiVA: diva2:1064326
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research 

Karolinska Institutet Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Stockholm 

Royal Society 

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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