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Risk of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in relatives of people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Swedish National Prison and Probation Administration Research and Development, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2013 (English)In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 203, no 2, 103-106 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and it has been suggested that combined bipolar disorder and ADHD is aetiologically distinct from the pure disorders.

AIMS: To clarify whether ADHD shares genetic and environmental factors with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

METHOD: By linking longitudinal Swedish national registers, we identified 61 187 persons with ADHD (the proband group) and their first- and second-degree relatives, and matched them with a control group of people without ADHD and their corresponding relatives. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risks of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in the relatives of the two groups.

RESULTS: First-degree relatives of the ADHD proband group were at increased risk of both bipolar disorder (odds ratio (OR) = 1.84-2.54 for parents, offspring and full siblings) and schizophrenia (OR = 1.71-2.22 for parents, offspring and full siblings). The risks of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia among second-degree relatives were substantially lower than among full siblings.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the co-occurrence of ADHD and bipolar disorder as well as ADHD and schizophrenia is due to shared genetic factors, rather than representing completely aetiologically distinct subsyndromes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal College of Psychiatrists , 2013. Vol. 203, no 2, 103-106 p.
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54543DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.112.120808ISI: 000323192600006PubMedID: 23703314Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84881130601OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54543DiVA: diva2:1064346
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stockholm County Council ALF 20100305

Karolinska Institute ALF 20100305

Swedish Medical Research Council K2010-61X-21569-01-1  K2010-61P-21568-01-4  2010-3184

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development HD061817

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-01-24Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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