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Childhood neurodevelopmental disorders and violent criminality: a sibling control study
Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; Swedish Prison and Probation Service, R&D Unit, Göteborg, Sweden; Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; Swedish Prison and Probation Service, R&D Unit, Göteborg, Sweden.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 44, no 11, 2707-2716 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The longitudinal relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and violent criminality has been extensively documented, while long-term effects of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), tic disorders (TDs), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) on criminality have been scarcely studied. Using population-based registers of all child and adolescent mental health services in Stockholm, we identified 3,391 children, born 1984-1994, with neurodevelopmental disorders, and compared their risk for subsequent violent criminality with matched controls. Individuals with ADHD or TDs were at elevated risk of committing violent crimes, no such association could be seen for ASDs or OCD. ADHD and TDs are risk factors for subsequent violent criminality, while ASDs and OCD are not associated with violent criminality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Springer, 2014. Vol. 44, no 11, 2707-2716 p.
Keyword [en]
Autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit, hyperactivity disorder, neurodevelopmental disorders, criminality, familial confounding
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54560DOI: 10.1007/s10803-013-1873-0ISI: 000343724000004PubMedID: 23807203Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84910148902OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54560DiVA: diva2:1064367
Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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