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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and adverse outcomes in offspring: genetic and environmental sources of covariance
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, United States.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2014 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 44, no 5, 456-467 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maternal smoking during pregnancy (SDP) has been associated with several psychiatric outcomes in the offspring; studies have questioned whether the associations are causal, however. We analyzed all children born in Sweden between 1983 and 2009 to investigate the effect of SDP on multiple indicators of adverse outcomes in three areas: pregnancy outcomes (birth weight, preterm birth and being born small for gestational age), long-term cognitive abilities (low academic achievement and general cognitive ability) and externalizing behaviors (criminal conviction, violent criminal conviction and drug misuse). SDP was associated with all outcomes. Within-family analyses of the pregnancy outcomes were consistent with a causal interpretation as the associations persisted when siblings discordant for SDP were compared. For the cognitive and externalizing outcomes, the results were not consistent with causal effects; when comparing differentially exposed siblings none of the associations remained significant. In quantitative genetic models genetic factors explained the majority of the associations between SDP and cognitive and externalizing outcomes. The results suggest that the associations between SDP in mothers and cognition and externalizing behaviors in their offspring is primarily due to genetic effects that influence the behaviors in both generations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014. Vol. 44, no 5, 456-467 p.
Keyword [en]
Smoking during pregnancy; Children of siblings; Sibling comparison; Cousin comparison; Extended family model
National Category
Medical Genetics Psychology
Research subject
Genetics; Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54585DOI: 10.1007/s10519-014-9668-4ISI: 000341495100004PubMedID: 25117564Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84906809861OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54585DiVA: diva2:1064412
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development HD061817

Swedish Research Council through the Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social And Medical Sciences (SIMSAM) 340-2013-5867

Swedish Prison and Probation Services

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-01-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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