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Fetal growth and psychiatric and socioeconomic problems: population-based sibling comparison
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, United States.
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, United States.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
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2014 (English)In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 205, no 5, p. 355-361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: It is unclear whether associations between fetal growth and psychiatric and socioeconomic problems are consistent with causal mechanisms.

Aims: To estimate the extent to which associations are a result of unmeasured confounding factors using a sibling-comparison approach.

Method: We predicted outcomes from continuously measured birth weight in a Swedish population cohort (n = 3 291 773), while controlling for measured and unmeasured confounding.

Results: In the population, lower birth weight (⩽ 2500 g) increased the risk of all outcomes. Sibling-comparison models indicated that lower birth weight independently predicted increased risk for autism spectrum disorder (hazard ratio for low birth weight = 2.44, 95% CI 1.99-2.97) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although attenuated, associations remained for psychotic or bipolar disorder and educational problems. Associations with suicide attempt, substance use problems and social welfare receipt, however, were fully attenuated in sibling comparisons.

Conclusions: Results suggest that fetal growth, and factors that influence it, contribute to psychiatric and socioeconomic problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Royal College od Psychiatrists , 2014. Vol. 205, no 5, p. 355-361
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54586DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.143693ISI: 000344973700004PubMedID: 25257067Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84910002452OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54586DiVA, id: diva2:1064413
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institute of mental Health 

National Institute of Child Health and Development 

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research 

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, Henrik

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