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Longitudinal Stability of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Irritability: From Childhood to Young Adulthood
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0002-953X, E-ISSN 1535-7228, Vol. 172, no 7, 657-664 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Little is known about genetic influences on juvenile irritability and whether such influences are developmentally stable and/or dynamic. This study examined the temporal pattern of genetic and environmental effects on irritability using data from a prospective, four-wave longitudinal twin study.

Method: Parents and their twin children (N=2,620 children) from the Swedish Twin Study of Child and Adolescent Development reported on the children's irritability, defined using a previously identified scale from the Child Behavior Checklist.

Results: Genetic effects differed across the sexes, with males exhibiting increasing heritability from early childhood through young adulthood and females exhibiting decreasing heritability. Genetic innovation was also more prominent in males than in females, with new genetic risk factors affecting irritability in early and late adolescence for males. Shared environment was not a primary influence on irritability for males or females. Unique, nonshared environmental factors suggested strong effects early for males followed by an attenuating influence, whereas unique environmental factors were relatively stable for females.

Conclusions: Genetic effects on irritability are developmentally dynamic from middle childhood through young adulthood, with males and females displaying differing patterns. As males age, genetic influences on irritability increase while nonshared environmental influences weaken. Genetic contributions are quite strong in females early in life but decline in importance with age. In girls, nonshared environmental influences are fairly stable throughout development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Arlington, USA: American Psychiatric Publishing, 2015. Vol. 172, no 7, 657-664 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54603DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2015.14040509ISI: 000358189800012PubMedID: 25906668OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54603DiVA: diva2:1064432
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

NIMH 

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research 

Division of Intramural Research Programs, NIMH

Shire

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-01-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf