oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and risk for substance use disorders in relatives
Departments of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Departments of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 77, no 10, 880-886 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous research indicates that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is highly associated with substance use disorders (SUD). However, these studies have failed to clarify the nature of the overlap. The main aim of this study was to explore whether the overlap between ADHD and SUD could be explained by shared genetic and environmental factors or by harmful effects of ADHD medication.

Methods: We employed a matched cohort design across different levels of family relatedness recorded from 1973-2009. By linking longitudinal Swedish national registers, 62,015 ADHD probands and first-degree and second-degree relatives were identified and matched 1:10 with control subjects without ADHD and their corresponding relatives. Any record of SUD was defined by discharge diagnoses of the International Classification of Diseases or a purchase of any drug used in the treatment of SUD.

Results: First-degree relatives of ADHD probands were at elevated risk for SUD (odds ratios 2.2 and 1.8) compared with relatives of control subjects. The corresponding relative risk in second-degree relatives was substantially lower (odd ratios 1.4 and 1.4). The familial aggregation patterns remained similar for first-degree and second-degree relatives after excluding individuals with coexisting disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and conduct disorder.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the co-occurrence of ADHD and SUD is due to genetic factors shared between the two disorders, rather than to a general propensity for psychiatric disorders or harmful effects of ADHD medication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, USA: Elsevier, 2015. Vol. 77, no 10, 880-886 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54614DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.10.006ISI: 000353559600007PubMedID: 25457227Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928734603OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54614DiVA: diva2:1064448
Funder
Stockholm County CouncilSwedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Karolinska Institutet 

Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social And Medical Sciences 

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Larsson, Henrik
In the same journal
Biological Psychiatry
Medical and Health SciencesPsychiatryNeurosciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 106 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf