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Testing the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Hypothesis for Psychopathology Using Family-Based Quasi-Experimental Designs
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
Department of Health Studies, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
2014 (English)In: Child Development Perspectives, ISSN 1750-8592, E-ISSN 1750-8606, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 151-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis is a broad theoretical framework that emphasizes how early risk factors have a causal influence on psychopathology. Researchers have raised concerns about the causal interpretation of statistical associations between early risk factors and later psychopathology because most existing studies have been unable to rule out the possibility of environmental and genetic confounding. In this paper we illustrate how family-based quasi-experimental designs can test the DOHaD hypothesis by ruling out alternative hypotheses. We review the logic underlying sibling-comparison, co-twin control, offspring of siblings/twins, adoption, and in vitro fertilization designs. We then present results from studies using these designs focused on broad indices of fetal development (low birth weight and gestational age) and a particular teratogen, smoking during pregnancy. The results provide mixed support for the DOHaD hypothesis for psychopathology, illustrating the critical need to use design features that rule out unmeasured confounding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. Vol. 8, no 3, p. 151-157
Keywords [en]
Developmental origins of health and disease, pregnancy, quasi-experiment, birth weight, preterm birth, smoking during pregnancy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54665DOI: 10.1111/cdep.12078ISI: 000344781700006PubMedID: 25364377Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84906260648OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54665DiVA, id: diva2:1064532
Note

Funding Agency:

NCATS NIH HHS 

Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, Henrik

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