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Prevalence, Incidence and Risk Factors for Sleep Deprivation in Adolescence: The Role of Technology and Stress
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (CHAMP)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1485-8564
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2718-7402
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5359-0452
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: The first aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and incidence of poor sleep duration (<7 hours) over a one year period in a large sample of adolescents. The second aim was to inform prevention about the influence of adolescents´ social context on sleep duration. Therefore, we wanted to describe the longitudinal association between the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at bedtime and daily stressors (e.g. school performance, family and peer issues) and poor sleep duration.

Method: Participants were high school students in the 7th and 8th grade (N = 2505; age range: 12-15 years, at baseline) from 17 public schools in three communities in middle Sweden. Students filled out questionnaires in school during the spring, 2014 and one year later (85% retention rate). Sleep measures included bed time (BT), wake up time (WUT), and sleep onset latency (SOL). Total sleep time was calculated as, BT + WUT - SOL.

We calculated prevalence, incidence, and chronicity of poor sleep duration. Moreover, the effect of ICT and daily stressors on future sleep duration was estimated with odds ratios, controlling for gender.

Results: Prevalence (18.6%), incidence (12.8%) and chronicity (50%) rates indicate that poor sleep duration was persistent and increased one year later. Moreover, adolescents who often used ICT at bedtime (OR = 1.21, p < .001) and reported more school stress (OR = 1.16, p = .02), were more likely to report poor sleep duration one year later.

Conclusion: Because poor sleep duration is common and persists over time, it is crucial to intervene early to prevent chronic sleep deprivation. Sleep interventions with younger adolescence, before chronicity occurs, should focus on barriers to change, such as stress and use of technology. The results from this study have been used to develop an early school-based intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54732DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.14162.35527OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54732DiVA, id: diva2:1065902
Conference
8th World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies (WCBCT 2016), Melbourne, Australia, June 22-25, 2016
Projects
Trestadsstudien
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasVINNOVASwedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2017-01-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Bauducco, SerenaFlink, IdaLinton, Steven J.

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