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Genetic and environmental influences on adult human height across birth cohorts from 1886 to 1994
Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
Number of Authors: 99
2016 (English)In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 5, e20320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human height variation is determined by genetic and environmental factors, but it remains unclear whether their influences differ across birth-year cohorts. We conducted an individual-based pooled analysis of 40 twin cohorts including 143,390 complete twin pairs born 1886-1994. Although genetic variance showed a generally increasing trend across the birth-year cohorts, heritability estimates (0.69-0.84 in men and 0.53-0.78 in women) did not present any clear pattern of secular changes. Comparing geographic-cultural regions (Europe, North America and Australia, and East Asia), total height variance was greatest in North America and Australia and lowest in East Asia, but no clear pattern in the heritability estimates across the birth-year cohorts emerged. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that heritability of height is lower in populations with low living standards than in affluent populations, nor that heritability of height will increase within a population as living standards improve.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, United Kingdom: eLife Sciences Publications Ltd , 2016. Vol. 5, e20320
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55060DOI: 10.7554/eLife.20320ISI: 000391277600001PubMedID: 27964777Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85006379669OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55060DiVA: diva2:1069907
Note

Funding Agency:

Suomen Akatemia 266592

Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30 Last updated: 2017-03-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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