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The Relationship between IQ and PM2.5: Findings from the University of Southern California Twin Study
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
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2016 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 772-773Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examined the longitudinal relationship between IQ and fine particulate matter (\2.5lm aerodynamic diameters; PM2.5) exposure in urban-dwelling children, using prospective longitudinal data from the USC Twin Study of Risk Factors for Antisocial Behavior (RFAB; Baker et al. 2013). Residential addresses were collected via selfreports. Verbal and Performance IQ during childhood (age 9–10) and young adulthood (age 19–20) were evaluated by the Wechsler Abbreviated Intelligence Scale (Wechsler, 1999) using four subtests: VIQ=Vocabulary Similarities; PIQ=Block Design Matrices. Based on residential addresses and spatiotemporal generalized additive model of local monitoring data for PM2.5, we estimated 1-year average exposure before each assessment. A three-level mixed effects model regressing IQ scores at each assessment on time-varying air pollution exposures, accounting for both within-family (random intercepts) and within-individual (random slopes) was used. PM2.5 exposure had significant adverse effects on PIQ (95 % CI of b:-7.29 to-1.01, p\.05) but not VIQ (95 % CI of b:-4.50 to-1.96). Adverse effects of PM2.5 exposure remained significant after adjusting for age, family SES, sex, race/ethnicity, parental cognitive abilities, neighborhood SES, neighborhood quality and neighborhood greenness; the association was still significant after further adjusting for traffic distance (300 m), temperature, humidity and annual NOx. PM2.5 exposure confers stronger adverse effects on PIQ in low SES families, males, and during pre-adolescence. Our findings reveal social disparities and sexual dimorphism in the adverse PM2.5 exposure effects on PIQ. Baker, L., Tuvblad, C., Wang, P., Gomez, K., Bezdjian, S., Niv, S., & Raine, A. (2013). The Southern California Twin Register at the University of Southern California: III. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 16(1), 336–343; Wechsler, D. (1999). Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI). San Antonio, Texas: Harcourt Assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016. Vol. 46, no 6, p. 772-773
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55074DOI: 10.1007/s10519-016-9812-4ISI: 000386706600007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55074DiVA, id: diva2:1069932
Conference
46th Annual Behavior Genetics Meeting (BGA 2016), Brisbane, Australia, June 20-23, 2016
Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-01-30 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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