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Examining the validity and sensitivity to change of the 5 and 10 sit-to-stand tests in people with multiple sclerosis
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. (University Health Care Research Center)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9760-3785
NeuroRehab Unit, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Physiotherapy. (University Health Care Research Center)
NeuroRehab Unit, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background and Purpose: Sit-to-stand transfers are frequently performed, and transfers have been associated with fall risk among people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). There is limited research regarding the validity of sit-to-stand tests (STSs) in PwMS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the concurrent, divergent, and discriminant validity and sensitivity to change of the 5 and 10 STSs.

Methods: A repeated-measurement design was used, with data collected before and directly after a 7-week intervention, as well as prospectively reported near-fall incidents and falls during a 14-week period. One hundred two PwMS with a limited (≤200 m) but retained (≥20 m) walking ability were identified by physiotherapists at outpatient rehabilitation centres in 5 Swedish County Council areas and invited to participate in an intervention study. Of the 52 participants agreeing to participate and fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 47 managed the tests at baseline, and 39 of these returned complete fall diaries. The main outcomes were the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go test (TUG), 10-m walk test, 2-min walk test, Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Function, falls, near-fall incidents, and use of walking aids.

Results: Correlations in the total sample were above .60 between the STSs and BBS, TUG, 10-m walk test, and 2-min walk test and above .50 between the STSs and total number of falls. Both tests discriminated between those who did and did not use walking aids for the TUG, but not between fallers and nonfallers. There were no significant correlations between the STSs and number of falls or near-fall incidents. The STSs did not differentiate between participants with changed and unchanged results on the BBS.

Discussion: The 5 and 10 STSs are valid in PwMS with an Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤6.0 but do not identify fallers and have limited ability to detect change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
West Sussex, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons, 2017.
Keyword [en]
Multiple sclerosis, postural balance, validation studies
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54388DOI: 10.1002/pri.1681PubMedID: 28044398OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-54388DiVA: diva2:1072089
Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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