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Are men getting more emotional?: Critical sociological perspectives on men, masculinities and emotions
Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art. (Aesthetics, Culture and Media)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9067-9496
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. (Centre for Feminist Studies)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9808-1413
2017 (English)In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 779-796Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sociological research, influenced by feminist and other critical perspectives, has noted how men’s emotional inexpressiveness was influenced, and supported, by patriarchal privilege. Such approaches have argued that ‘inexpression’ needs to be broken down in order to build gender equality and improve men’s own wellbeing. Emerging research has, however, challenged the argument that men are ‘emotionally inexpressive’ on two main premises: that, as a result of feminist critiques, many men now practise ‘softer’ or ‘more emotional’ forms of masculinity; second, that emotions always influence social action and so need to be better incorporated into sociological accounts of men’s behaviour. Yet these approaches entail some conceptual confusion as to what emotions are, how they link to social action and whether men’s emotions are inherently transformative for gender relations. This article first details how emotions and masculinity have been theorized in feminist-inspired approaches. It outlines recent work on emotions, men and masculinities before arguing for an understanding of emotions that engages with both physiologically grounded and postconstructionist debates. It finally suggests incorporating a material-discursive approach to men’s emotions, through feminist work on affect, which is attentive to the political dimensions of ‘increasing emotionality’ in order to contribute to a developing field of sociological research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017. Vol. 65, no 4, p. 779-796
Keywords [en]
affect, critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM), emotion, masculinities, masculinity, men
National Category
Sociology Gender Studies
Research subject
Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55400DOI: 10.1177/0038026116686500ISI: 000423278000014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85030773159OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55400DiVA, id: diva2:1072174
Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-07 Last updated: 2018-07-30Bibliographically approved

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de Boise, SamHearn, Jeff

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