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The Prevalence of Celiac Disease in the United States
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.
Department of Pediatrics, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1024-5602
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1941-9090
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2012 (English)In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 107, no 10, 1538-1544 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in the United States is unknown. We sought to estimate CD prevalence nationwide by using a nationally representative sample.

METHODS: This study included 7,798 persons aged 6 years or older who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010. Serum samples from all participants were tested for immunoglobulin A (IgA) tissue transglutaminase antibodies and, if findings were abnormal, also for IgA endomysial antibodies. Information about prior diagnosis of CD and use of a gluten-free diet (GFD) was obtained by direct interview. CD was defined as having either double-positive serology (serologically diagnosed CD) or a reported diagnosis of CD by a doctor or other health-care professional and being on a GFD (reported clinical diagnosis of CD).

RESULTS: CD was found in 35 participants, 29 of whom were unaware of their diagnosis. Median age was 45 years (interquartile range, 23-66 years); 20 were women and 29 were non-Hispanic white. The prevalence of CD in the United States was 0.71% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.58-0.86%), with 1.01% (95% CI, 0.78-1.31%) among non-Hispanic whites. In all, 55 participants reported following a GFD, which corresponded to a prevalence of 0.63% (95% CI, 0.36-1.07%).

CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of CD in the United States was 0.71% (1 in 141), similar to that found in several European countries. However, most cases were undiagnosed. CD was rare among minority groups but affected 1% of non-Hispanic whites. Most persons who were following a GFD did not have a diagnosis of CD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2012. Vol. 107, no 10, 1538-1544 p.
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55687DOI: 10.1038/ajg.2012.219ISI: 000309701000013PubMedID: 22850429Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84867101027OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55687DiVA: diva2:1074139
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Centers for Disease Control M26561

American College of Gastroenterology Junior Faculty Development Award

Fulbright Commission

Available from: 2017-02-14 Created: 2017-02-14 Last updated: 2017-02-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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