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Dynamics of the human gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0122-7234
Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA.
Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, USA.
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California, USA.
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2017 (English)In: Nature microbiology, ISSN 2058-5276, Vol. 2, no 5, 17004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by flares of inflammation with a periodic need for increased medication and sometimes even surgery. The aetiology of IBD is partly attributed to a deregulated immune response to gut microbiome dysbiosis. Cross-sectional studies have revealed microbial signatures for different IBD subtypes, including ulcerative colitis, colonic Crohn's disease and ileal Crohn's disease. Although IBD is dynamic, microbiome studies have primarily focused on single time points or a few individuals. Here, we dissect the long-term dynamic behaviour of the gut microbiome in IBD and differentiate this from normal variation. Microbiomes of IBD subjects fluctuate more than those of healthy individuals, based on deviation from a newly defined healthy plane (HP). Ileal Crohn's disease subjects deviated most from the HP, especially subjects with surgical resection. Intriguingly, the microbiomes of some IBD subjects periodically visited the HP then deviated away from it. Inflammation was not directly correlated with distance to the healthy plane, but there was some correlation between observed dramatic fluctuations in the gut microbiome and intensified medication due to a flare of the disease. These results will help guide therapies that will redirect the gut microbiome towards a healthy state and maintain remission in IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Nature Publishing Group, 2017. Vol. 2, no 5, 17004
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Research subject
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55696DOI: 10.1038/nmicrobiol.2017.4ISI: 000404894200015PubMedID: 28191884Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85012903225OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55696DiVA: diva2:1074218
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RB13-0160Swedish Research Council, 521-2011-2764
Note

Funding Agencies:

United States National Institutes of Health  NIH IU54DE023798-01 

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  DE-AC05-76RLO1830 

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America  

Örebro University Hospital Research Foundation  OLL-507001 

Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program  

National Science Foundation (NSF)  DBI-1248096 

Available from: 2017-02-15 Created: 2017-02-15 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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