oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Methodological concerns using intra-cortical pins to measure tibiofemoral kinematics
Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Institution for Surgical Sciences, Section for Orthopedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Institution for Surgical Sciences, Section for Orthopedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Orthopedics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Institution for Surgical Sciences, Section for Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Show others and affiliations
2003 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 11, no 5, 344-349 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The complexity of human tibiofemoral joint motion is now better understood with the advancement of new methodologies to measure tibiofemoral kinematics in vivo. Marker clusters anchored to stainless steel bone pins inserted directly into the femur and tibia provide the most sensitive and accurate means for directly measuring skeletal tibiofemoral joint motion. Despite its invasiveness, this technique has been successful, although complications have been reported with the femoral pin and its insertion site. The purpose of this technical report is twofold: to review the difficulties with the femoral pin and its insertion site from a historical perspective, and to identify the load force required from biological tissue to permanently deform the pin. In addition, proposals in the advancement of this method are discussed in the context of reducing impingement with the femoral pin and the Iliotibial band. Because stainless steel exhibits plastic behaviour with no sharp yield point, Apex self-drilling/self-tapping bone pins underwent incremental loading on an Instron materials testing machine. Loads were transmitted perpendicular to the pin with the threads partially exposed and fully secured in vice. Since the accuracy of our combined stereophotogrammetry and Optoelectric motion analysis was less than 0.4 mm, it was decided that plastic deformation occurred after deflections of 0.4 mm. With exposed threads, deflections larger than 0.4 mm were observed at 150 N and 100 N when loads were applied at 15 mm and 20 mm from the vice (representative of where the tissue came in contact with the pin). Loads greater than 200 N produced deflections less than 0.2 mm when threads were fully inserted. The 90 Hz resonant frequency for the marker cluster-bone pin complex is beyond the spectrum of human movement and can be lowpass filtered. To reduce impingement and pin bending, one solution may be to implant pins with a shorter threaded section. By completely penetrating the bone, only the smooth surface of the pin is exposed which is more resistant to bending. Otherwise pins with larger diameters and longer longitudinal incisions about the femoral insertion site are an alternative. Lengthening the longitudinal incisions about the insertion site, and correctly aligning and inserting the femoral pin between the Iliotibial band and quadriceps tendon may diminish impingement. Performing dynamic open chain flexion and extension movements while on the operating table may aid in aligning the pin at the incision site. This may stretch the IT band and quadriceps tendon and may guide the femoral pin into a more optimal position prior to it being inserted into the cortex of the bone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Springer-Verlag New York, 2003. Vol. 11, no 5, 344-349 p.
Keyword [en]
Bone screws, knee joint, tibiofemoral kinematics, in vivo skeletal movement
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Orthopedics Sport and Fitness Sciences Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55758DOI: 10.1007/s00167-003-0388-1ISI: 000186030500013PubMedID: 12879227Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-1342343876OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55758DiVA: diva2:1074533
Available from: 2017-02-15 Created: 2017-02-15 Last updated: 2017-03-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wretenberg, Per
In the same journal
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Medical and Health SciencesOrthopedicsSport and Fitness SciencesSurgery

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 65 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf