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One year follow-up after operative ankle fractures: a prospective gait analysis study with a multi-segment foot model
Department of Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska Institute Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2010 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ankle fractures are one of the most common lower limb traumas. Several studies reported short- and long-term post-operative results, mainly determined by radiographic and subjective functional evaluations. Three-dimensional gait analysis with a multi-segment foot model was used in the current study to quantify the inter-segment foot motions in 18 patients 1 year after surgically treated ankle fractures. Data were compared to that from gender- and age-matched healthy controls. The correlations between Olerud/Molander ankle score and kinematics were also evaluated. Patients with ankle fractures showed less plantarflexion and smaller range of motion in the injured talocrural joint, which were believed to be a sign of residual joint stiffness after surgery and immobilization. Moreover, the forefoot segment had smaller sagittal and transverse ranges of motion, less plantarflexion and the hallux segment had less dorsiflexion and smaller sagittal range of motion. The deviations found in the forefoot segment may contribute to the compensation mechanisms of the injured ankle joint. Findings of our study show that gait analysis with a multi-segment foot model provides a quantitative and objective way to perform the dynamic assessment of post-operative ankle fractures, and makes it possible to better understand not only how the injured joint is affected, but also the surrounding joints.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Calre, Ireland: Elsevier, 2010. Vol. 31, no 2, p. 234-240
Keyword [en]
Ankle fractures, Operative treatment, Gait analysis, Multi-segment foot model, Olerud/Molander ankle score (OMAS)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Neurosciences Orthopaedics Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55783DOI: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2009.10.012ISI: 000274584800017PubMedID: 19942435Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-74449088350OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55783DiVA, id: diva2:1074574
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stiftelsen Frimurare Barnhuset i Stockholm

Stiftelsen Promobilia 

Available from: 2017-02-15 Created: 2017-02-15 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved

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