oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The association between asthma and allergic symptoms in children and phthalates in house dust: a nested case-control study
Swedish Natl. Testing/Res. Institute, Borås, Sweden; Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark; Public Health Science, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark; University of Medicine and Dentistry, NJ-Robert Wood Johnson Med. School, Piscataway, NJ, United States.
Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Show others and affiliations
2004 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 112, no 14, 1393-1397 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global phthalate ester production has increased from very low levels at the end of World War II to approximately 3.5 million metric tons/year. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential associations between persistent allergic symptoms in children, which have increased markedly in developed countries over the past three decades, and the concentration of phthalates in dust collected from their homes. This investigation is a case-control study nested within a cohort of 10,852 children. From the cohort, we selected 198 cases with persistent allergic symptoms and 202 controls without allergic symptoms. A clinical and a technical team investigated each child and her or his environment. We found higher median concentrations of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP) in dust among cases than among controls (0.15 vs. 0.12 mg/g dust). Analyzing the case group by symptoms showed that BBzP was associated with rhinitis (p = 0.001) and eczema (p = 0.001), whereas di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was associated with asthma (p = 0.022). Furthermore, dose-response relationships for these associations are supported by trend analyses. This study shows that phthalates, within the range of what is normally found in indoor environments, are associated with allergic symptoms in children. We believe that the different associations of symptoms for the three major phthalates-BBzP, DEHP, and di-n-butyl phthalate-can be explained by a combination of chemical physical properties and toxicologic potential. Given the phthalate exposures of children worldwide, the results from this study of Swedish children have global implications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) , 2004. Vol. 112, no 14, 1393-1397 p.
Keyword [en]
asthma; BBzP; children; DEHP; homes; phthalates
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-55841DOI: 10.1289/ehp.7187ISI: 000224337900034PubMedID: 15471731Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-4544241503OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-55841DiVA: diva2:1075321
Available from: 2017-02-17 Created: 2017-02-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hasselgren, Mikael
In the same journal
Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 7 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf