oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Local landscape effects on population dynamics of Ixodes ricinus
School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge; Inflammatory Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge; 3Inflammatory Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge.
2016 (English)In: Geospatial health, ISSN 1827-1987, Vol. 11, no 3, 283-289 p., 487Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ixodes ricinus, a common tick in Europe, transmits severe tickborne pathogens (TBPs). In Sweden, both prevalence and incidence of tick-borne infections have increased during the last few decades, and a majority of the cases is reported from the area around Stockholm. Among ticks, transmission of TBPs involves co-feeding of susceptible larvae or nymphs with infected ticks on the same host. Seasonal synchrony of immature stages and total tick abundance are important factors for the probability of horizontal transmission of TBPs. We have studied the association between local landscape characteristics and population dynamics and the probability of co-occurrence of different life cycle stages of I. ricinus at different locations south of Stockholm, Sweden. We found significant spatiotemporal variation in tick activity patterns. Mean tick abundance varied with a tenfold difference among study sites. The probability of co-occurrence of larvae, nymphs and female adults was highest in June and decreased significantly with vegetation height. In addition, the amount of forest habitat and open water in the surrounding landscape of the study sites expressed significant negative effects on tick abundance and co-occurrence, indicating that environmental heterogeneity may increase the likelihood of good rodent habitats, which in turn, are suitable hosts for immature ticks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Page Press Publications , 2016. Vol. 11, no 3, 283-289 p., 487
Keyword [en]
Ixodes ricinus; Abundance; Co-occurrence; Vegetation; Sweden
National Category
Infectious Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56061DOI: 10.4081/gh.2016.487ISI: 000397856400007PubMedID: 27903055Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84996554561OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56061DiVA: diva2:1078583
Note

Funding Agency:

Baltic and East European studies 

Available from: 2017-03-06 Created: 2017-03-06 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Asghar, NaveedJohansson, Magnus
By organisation
School of Medical Sciences
Infectious MedicinePublic Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 70 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf