oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis in adolescents and adults: Fusobacterium necrophorum is commonly found
Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Family Med, Malmo, Sweden.;Cent Hosp Vaxjo, Kronoberg Cty Council, Unit Res & Dev, Vaxjo, Sweden..
Cent Hosp Vaxjo, Dept Clin Microbiol, Vaxjo, Sweden..
Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Virol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Orebro University Hospital. Dept Lab Med, Clin Microbiol.
2015 (English)In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, ISSN 1198-743X, E-ISSN 1469-0691, Vol. 21, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sore throat is common in primary healthcare. Aetiological studies have focused on the presence of a limited number of pathogens. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of a wide range of bacteria and viruses, including Fusobacterium necrophorum, in patients with pharyngotonsillitis and in asymptomatic controls. A prospective case control study was performed in primary healthcare in Kronoberg County, Sweden. Patients (n = 220) aged 15 to 45 years with a suspected acute pharyngotonsillitis, and controls (n = 128), were included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed for beta-hemolytic streptococci, F. necrophorum, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and 13 respiratory viruses. Serum samples were analysed for antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. The patient history and symptoms, including Centor score, were analysed in relation to pathogens. In 155/220 (70.5%) of the patients, as compared to 26/128 (20.3%) of the controls (p < 0.001), at least one microorganism was found. Group A streptococci, F. necrophorum, and influenza B virus were the three most common findings, and all significantly more common in patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p 0.001, and p 0.002, respectively). Patients with F. necrophorum only (n = 14) displayed a lower Centor score than patients with Group A streptococcus only (n = 46), but a higher score than patients with influenza B, other viruses, or no potential pathogen (Kruskal-Wallis p < 0.001). A pathogen was detected in 70% of the patients, displaying a wide range of pathogens contributing to the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis. This study supports F. necrophorum as one of the pathogens to be considered in the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis. Clinical Microbiology and Infection (C) 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Open access under CC BY-NC-ND license.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 21, no 3
Keyword [en]
Aetiology, centor score, pharyngotonsillitis, primary healthcare
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56378DOI: 10.1016/j.cmi.2014.08.020ISI: 000367383300016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56378DiVA: diva2:1081962
Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-15 Last updated: 2017-03-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sundqvist, Martin
By organisation
Orebro University Hospital
In the same journal
Clinical Microbiology and Infection
Infectious Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf