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Routines for reducing the occurrence of emergence agitation during awakening in children, a national survey
Örebro University Hospital. Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Örebro University Hospital. Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
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2014 (English)In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 3, article id 572Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emergence agitation following anesthesia in children is not uncommon. It is, although generally self-limiting, associated with both patient and parents distress. We conducted a national survey around the management of behavioral and neurocognitive disturbances after surgery/anesthesia including a case scenario about a child at risk for emergence reaction. Premedication with clonidine or midazolam would have been used 58 and 37% of responders respectively. A propofol based anesthesia was the most common anesthetic technique, however sevoflurane or desflurane was an option for 45 and 8% of responders. Before awakening 65% would have administered an opioid, 48% a low-dose of propofol and 25% clonidine. Sign or symptoms of behavioral disturbance was not assessed by standardize assessment tools.

A majority of Swedish anesthesia personnel would undertake some preventive action when handling a child at risk for an emergence reaction, the preventive measure differed and it seems as there is an obvious room for further improvements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014. Vol. 3, article id 572
Keywords [en]
Emergence agitation, Premedication, Generalanesthesia, Postoperative pain, Postoperative recovery and volatile anesthetics, Volatile anesthetics
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56501DOI: 10.1186/2193-1801-3-572ISI: 000359103500005PubMedID: 25332872Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84933528145OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56501DiVA, id: diva2:1082482
Available from: 2017-03-16 Created: 2017-03-16 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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