oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Season of birth in a nationwide cohort of coeliac disease patients
Columbia Univ Coll Phys & Surg, Dept Med, Coeliac Dis Ctr, New York, NY 10032 USA.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
Columbia Univ Coll Phys & Surg, Dept Med, Coeliac Dis Ctr, New York, NY 10032 USA..
Mayo Clin, Coll Med, Dept Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Rochester, MN USA..ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1941-9090
Örebro University Hospital. Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1024-5602
2013 (English)In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 98, no 1, 48-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and objective Genetic factors alone cannot explain the risk of developing coeliac disease (CD). Children born in summer months are likely to be weaned and introduced to gluten during winter when viral infections are more frequent. Earlier studies on birth season and CD are limited in sample size and results are contradictory. Method Case-control study. We used biopsy reports from all 28 Swedish pathology departments to identify individuals with CD, defined as small intestinal villous atrophy (n=29 096). The government agency Statistics Sweden then identified 144 522 controls matched for gender, age, calendar year and county. Through conditional logistic regression we examined the association between summer birth (March-August) and later CD diagnosis (outcome measure). Results Some 54.10% of individuals with CD versus 52.75% of controls were born in the summer months. Summer birth was hence associated with a small increased risk of later CD (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.08; p<0.0001). Stratifying CD patients according to age at diagnosis, we found the highest OR in those diagnosed before age 2 years (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.26), while summer birth was not associated with a CD diagnosis in later childhood (age 2-18 years: OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.08), but had a marginal effect on the risk of CD in adulthood (age >= 18 years: OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07). Conclusions In this study, summer birth was associated with an increased risk of later CD, but the excess risk was small, and general infectious disease exposure early in life is unlikely to be a major cause of CD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 98, no 1, 48-51 p.
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56600DOI: 10.1136/archdischild-2012-302360ISI: 000312593100014PubMedID: 23172784OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56600DiVA: diva2:1083212
Available from: 2017-03-20 Created: 2017-03-20 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Murray, Joseph A.Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
By organisation
Örebro University Hospital
In the same journal
Archives of Disease in Childhood
Pediatrics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 97 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf