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Changes in BMI and Psychosocial Functioning in Partners of Women Who Undergo Gastric Bypass Surgery for Obesity
Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
Ersta Hosp, Dept Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
Uppsala Univ, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
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2015 (English)In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 25, no 2, 319-324 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is very little research exploring the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on the patient's partner. The aim of the present study was to investigate longitudinally whether male partners of female RYGB patients were affected in terms of BMI, sleep quality, body dissatisfaction, depression, and anxiety. Thirty-seven women, with partners who were willing to participate, were recruited from RYGB waiting lists at five Swedish hospitals. Data collection took place during two home visits, 3 months before and 9 months after RYGB surgery. Anthropometrical data were documented, and both women and men completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ). The men also completed the Male Body Dissatisfaction Scale (MBDS). The men's BMI changes between the two time points that were analysed using general estimating equation (GEE) regression. Their BMI decreased significantly (beta = -0.9, p = 0.004). The change was more pronounced in the 26 men who had a baseline BMI of a parts per thousand yen25 (beta = -1.4, p < 0.001). Fixed-effects regression showed a statistically significant association between the men's weight loss and that of the women (beta = 0.3, p = 0.004). There were no significant changes in the men's HADS, KSQ, or MBDS scores. Overweight/obese male partners of RYGB patients also lose weight during the first 9 months post-operatively. However, symptoms of body dissatisfaction, anxiety, and depression remain unchanged, as does self-reported sleep quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 25, no 2, 319-324 p.
Keyword [en]
Spousal effects, Gastric bypass surgery, Psychosocial, Longitudinal
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56675DOI: 10.1007/s11695-014-1398-4ISI: 000348111000018PubMedID: 25148886OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56675DiVA: diva2:1083575
Available from: 2017-03-21 Created: 2017-03-21 Last updated: 2017-03-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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