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Association of Bariatric Surgery With Long-term Remission of Type 2 Diabetes and With Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications
Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Chron Dis Prevent, Helsinki, Finland..ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3767-4223
Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0619-2683
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2014 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 311, no 22, 2297-2304 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE Short-term studies show that bariatric surgery causes remission of diabetes. The long-term outcomes for remission and diabetes-related complications are not known.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term diabetes remission rates and the cumulative incidence of microvascular and macrovascular diabetes complications after bariatric surgery.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) is a prospective matched cohort study conducted at 25 surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden. Of patients recruited between September 1,1987, and January 31, 2001, 260 of 2037 control patients and 343 of 2010 surgery patients had type 2 diabetes at baseline. For the current analysis, diabetes status was determined at SOS health examinations until May 22, 2013. Information on diabetes complications was obtained from national health registers until December 31, 2012. Participation rates at the 2-, 10-, and 15-year examinations were 81%, 58%, and 41% in the control group and 90%, 76%, and 47% in the surgery group. For diabetes assessment, the median follow-up time was 10 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2-15) and 10 years (IQR, 10-15) in the control and surgery groups, respectively. For diabetes complications, the median follow-up time was 17.6 years (IQR, 14.2-19.8) and 18.1 years (IQR, 15.2-21.1) in the control and surgery groups, respectively.

INTERVENTIONS: Adjustable or nonadjustable banding (n = 61), vertical banded gastroplasty (n = 227), or gastric bypass (n = 55) procedures were performed in the surgery group, and usual obesity and diabetes care was provided to the control group.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Diabetes remission, relapse, and diabetes complications. Remission was defined as blood glucose <110 mg/dL and no diabetes medication.

RESULTS: The diabetes remission rate 2 years after surgery was 16.4% (95% CL, 11.7%-22.2%; 34/207) for control patients and 72.3% (95% Cl, 66.9%-77.2%; 219/303) for bariatric surgery patients (odds ratio [OR], 13.3; 95% Cl, 8.5-20.7; P < .001). At 15 years, the diabetes remission rates decreased to 6.5% (4/62) for control patients and to 30.4% (35/115) for bariatric surgery patients (OR, 6.3; 95% Cl, 2.1-18.9; P < .001). With long-term follow-up, the cumulative incidence of microvascular complications was 41.8 per 1000 person-years (95% Cl, 35.3-49.5) for control patients and 20.6 per 1000 person-years (95% Cl, 17.0-24.9) in the surgery group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.44; 95% Cl, 0.34-0.56; P < .001). Macrovascular complications were observed in 44.2 per 1000 person-years (95% Cl, 37.5-52.1) in control patients and 31.7 per 1000 person-years (95% Cl, 27.0-37.2) for the surgical group (HR, 0.68; 95% Cl, 0.54-0.85; P = .001).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this very long-term follow-up observational study of obese patients with type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery was associated with more frequent diabetes remission and fewer complications than usual care. These findings require confirmation in randomized trials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association , 2014. Vol. 311, no 22, 2297-2304 p.
National Category
Family Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56714DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.5988ISI: 000336972600021PubMedID: 24915261ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84902168647OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56714DiVA: diva2:1083836
Available from: 2017-03-22 Created: 2017-03-22 Last updated: 2017-03-22Bibliographically approved

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Peltonen, MarkkuAhlin, SofieAndersson-Assarsson, JohannaNäslund, IngmarSvensson, Per-ArneSjöholm, Kajsa
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