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Enactment Effect In Development: Comparing Action Memory In School-Aged Children
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (CHAMP)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6438-3800
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. (CHAMP)
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Memory works better when we have hands on experience with learning materials. In a same way, children remember action phrases better if they are instructed to enact it rather than when they only read it or watch someone else do it. We investigated this enactment effect in different grades´ children in order to find out the developmental pattern of differences.  In this study, we first tried to replicate typical enactment effect in children. Then, we compared memory in subject-performed tasks, experimenter-performed tasks and verbal tasks using three memory tests (free recall, cued recall, and recognition) in children. Four hundred and ten pupils from four grades (2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th) participated in the study. The results showed that first, there is an enactment effect in school-aged children as well as in adults. Second, the encoding conditions and memory tests determine memory performance in children. And most important, the findings indicated that there were significant differencesfrom grade 2 to grade 8 in free recall and cued recall, but not recognition of all three learning conditions. These findings indicate that action memory develops through school ages. In another word, age has an important role in memory and especially enactment effect; older children had better recall performance in all kind of encoding conditions. These findings can be explained through development of memory strategies, item-specific information processing, and relational information processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56731OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56731DiVA: diva2:1083946
Conference
17th European Conference on Developmental Psychology
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2017-04-24Bibliographically approved

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Badinlou, FarzanehKormi-Nouri, Reza
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Citation style
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