oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Whole-genome sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis directly from clinical samples without culture
Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Hinxton CB10 1SA, Cambs, England..
Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Hinxton CB10 1SA, Cambs, England..ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1512-6194
Univ Southampton, Southampton Gen Hosp, Fac Med, Mol Microbiol Grp, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England..
Natl Hlth Lab Serv, Natl Inst Communicable Dis, Ctr HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infect, ZA-2131 Johannesburg, South Africa..
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Genome Research, ISSN 1088-9051, E-ISSN 1549-5469, Vol. 23, no 5, 855-866 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of whole-genome sequencing as a tool for the study of infectious bacteria is of growing clinical interest. Chlamydia trachomatis is responsible for sexually transmitted infections and the blinding disease trachoma, which affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Recombination is widespread within the genome of C. trachomatis, thus whole-genome sequencing is necessary to understand the evolution, diversity, and epidemiology of this pathogen. Culture of C trachomatis has, until now, been a prerequisite to obtain DNA for whole-genome sequencing; however, as C trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen, this procedure is technically demanding and time consuming. Discarded clinical samples represent a large resource for sequencing the genomes of pathogens, yet clinical swabs frequently contain very low levels of C trachomatis DNA and large amounts of contaminating microbial and human DNA. To determine whether it is possible to obtain whole-genome sequences from bacteria without the need for culture, we have devised an approach that combines immunomagnetic separation (IMS) for targeted bacterial enrichment with multiple displacement amplification (MDA) for whole-genome amplification. Using IMS-MDA ill conjunction with high-throughput multiplexed Illumina sequencing, we have produced the first whole bacterial genome sequences direct from clinical samples. We also show that this method can be used to generate genome data from nonviable archived samples. This method will prove a useful tool in answering questions relating to the biology of many difficult-to-culture or fastidious bacteria of clinical concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press (CSHL), 2013. Vol. 23, no 5, 855-866 p.
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56736DOI: 10.1101/gr.150037.112ISI: 000318202400010PubMedID: 23525359OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56736DiVA: diva2:1083951
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2017-03-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Harris, Simon R.Unemo, MagnusClarke, Ian N.Parkhill, Julian
By organisation
Orebro University Hospital
In the same journal
Genome Research
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 4 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf