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Surveillance of invasive Neisseria meningitidis with a serogroup Y update, Sweden 2010 to 2012
National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology/Molecular diagnostics R&D, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Orebro University Hospital. National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology/Molecular diagnostics R&D.
Orebro University Hospital. National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology/Molecular diagnostics R&D.
Orebro University Hospital. National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology/Molecular diagnostics R&D.
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2014 (English)In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 19, no 42, 25-33 p., UNSP 20940Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increase of invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y has been noted in Sweden since 2005, and to a lower extent throughout Europe. The present study describes the epidemiology of invasive N. meningitidis isolates in Sweden in the period between 2010 and 2012, with a focus on serogroup Y. We also aimed to find an optimal molecular typing scheme for both surveillance and outbreak investigations. All invasive N. meningitidis isolates in Sweden during the study period (n=208) were genetically characterised. Serogroup Y predominated with 22/57, 31/61 and 44/90 of all invasive isolates (incidence 0.23, 0.33 and 0.46 per 100,000 population) in 2010, 2011 and 2012 respectively. In each of these years, 15/22, 22/31 and 19/44 of serogroup Y isolates were genetically clonal (Y: P1.5-2,10-1,36-2: F4-1: ST-23(cc23), 'porB allele 3-36, fHbp allele 25 and penA allele 22). Our findings further support those of others that currently recommended FetA typing could be replaced by FHbp. Moreover, in line with a previous study that we conducted, the current results indicate that highly variable multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (HV-MLVA) can be used as a first-hand rapid method for small outbreak investigations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) , 2014. Vol. 19, no 42, 25-33 p., UNSP 20940
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56762ISI: 000343764900005PubMedID: 25358044ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84927565214OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56762DiVA: diva2:1084045
Note

Funding Agencies:

Örebro County Council Research Committee

Foundation for Medical Research at Orebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden

Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2017-03-23Bibliographically approved

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Thulin [Hedberg], SaraJacobsson, SusanneFredlund, HansMölling, Paula
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