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Psychopathic Personality in the General Population: Differences and Similarities Across Gender
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands; Center for Criminological and Psychosocial Research, Örebro University, Sweden.
Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
Department of Psychology and Disruptive Behavior Clinic, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, United States.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden. Center for Criminological and Psychosocial Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8163-6558
2017 (English)In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579X, E-ISSN 1943-2763, Vol. 31, no 1, 49-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to identify distinct subgroups of adults in a general population sample (N = 2,500; 52.6% females) based on their scores on three psychopathy dimensions. Using latent profile analysis, five groups were identified among males and females separately, including a psychopathic personality group. Multivariate analyses of variance showed that this latter group had higher levels of aggression, offending, substance use, attention-deficit/hyperactivity symptoms, internalizing problems, and maltreatment than most of the other groups. Associated features of males and females with a psychopathic personality were very similar; however, salient gender differences did emerge. Specifically, females with a psychopathic personality were more frequently exposed to sexual abuse, expressed more emotional difficulties, and engaged in higher levels of relational aggression. In conclusion, person-oriented analyses identified adults with a personality that looks like psychopathy, and furthered our understanding of gender similarities and differences in these adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Guilford Publications, 2017. Vol. 31, no 1, 49-74 p.
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56998DOI: 10.1521/pedi_2016_30_237ISI: 000395227100004PubMedID: 26845529Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85014104698OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-56998DiVA: diva2:1087907
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-04-10Bibliographically approved

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Andershed, Henrik
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School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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