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Young Adults Victimized as Children or Adolescents: Relationships Between Perpetrator Patterns, Poly-Victimization, and Mental Health Problems
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4700-1452
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden.
University of Memphis, TN, USA.
University of Notre Dame, IN, USA.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Child and adolescent victims of violence are often exposed to more than

one kind of physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment. Both individually

and cumulatively, such victimizations have significant ramifications on mental

health. Yet little is known about the relationships in which these different

kinds of victimizations occur and how the relationship between the victim

and perpetrators may influence later mental health. This retrospective, selfreport

study of a nationally representative sample of 2,500 young adults

in Sweden examines associations between different types of victimization

(including poly-victimization), the victim’s relationship to the perpetrator,

and how these factors are related to current mental health. Results indicate

differential patterns of abuse based on the perpetrator; parents were most

likely to use physical aggression, whereas siblings typically perpetrated

property crimes and partners committed sexual assault. Peers were the

most likely perpetrator of both physical and verbal victimizations and also

most often committed poly-victimization by subjecting youth to multiple

forms of violence. While males were more likely to be victimized by peers,

females were more likely to be victimized by parents, siblings, and partners.

Significant positive relations were found for the amount of victimization by

peers and mental health problems among both males and females. In addition,

for females, higher amounts of youth victimization by parents and partners

related to higher levels of mental health problems during young adulthood.

Taken together, these results suggest that peer victimization presents the

greatest risk for males, whereas dysfunctional family relationships are most

detrimental to victimized females.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017.
Keyword [en]
youth violence, violence exposure, PTSD
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57057DOI: 10.1177/0886260517701452OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-57057DiVA: diva2:1088811
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved

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Källström, ÅsaHellfeldt, Karin
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School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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Language
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