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A qualitative analysis of participants' reflections on body image during participation in a randomized controlled trial of acceptance and commitment therapy
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, S Huset,Van 2,Box 1613701, Orebro 16, Sweden..ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2655-3573
Uppsala University, Department of Psychology, Uppsala, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Orebro University Hospital.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Orebro University Hospital.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 4, 29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Negative body image is a risk factor for development and relapse in eating disorders (ED). Many patients continue to be dissatisfied with their body shape or weight after treatment. This study presents a qualitative analysis of written reflections on body image from patients with an ED and a negative body image before and after an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy group treatment at a specialized ED-unit.

Method: Before and after the treatment participants (n = 47) answered a questionnaire with open ended questions on their thoughts on body image. Data were analyzed through conventional content analysis.

Results: Body image meant different things for different participants. For some it had to do with how you evaluate your body, whereas others focused on whether their body image was realistic or not. Some emphasized their relationship with their body, while some described body image as strongly related to global self-esteem. These different views on the concept of body image affected the participants' descriptions of their own body image, and how they wanted it to change. Body image was considered a state that fluctuated from day to day. After treatment the participants described changes in their body image, for instance perceiving oneself as less judgmental towards one's body, and a shift in focus to the important things in life.

Conclusions: The participants had different views on body image and how they wished it to change. Thus treatment interventions targeting negative body image needs to address various aspects of this complex construct.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016. Vol. 4, 29
Keyword [en]
Acceptance and commitment therapy, Body dissatisfaction, Body image, Content analysis, Eating disorders, Qualitative research
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57168DOI: 10.1186/s40337-016-0120-4ISI: 000395714600001PubMedID: 27999670Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85003441548OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-57168DiVA: diva2:1090481
Note

Funding Agency:

Uppsala-Örebro Regional Research Council  RFR71381  RFR213931  RFR138611

Available from: 2017-04-24 Created: 2017-04-24 Last updated: 2017-04-24Bibliographically approved

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Fogelkvist, MariaKjellin, LarsAila-Gustafsson, Sanna
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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