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The relationship between prosthetic control, wearing pattern and daily prosthesis use
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4247-2236
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
2016 (English)In: “Advances in our Understanding”: The Compendium, 2016, 57-58 p.Conference paper, Abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim and objectives: Myoelectric prostheses are often prescribed to children with arm deficiency and prosthetic training is given regularly by the prosthetic clinics. One goal of prosthesis fitting is to give the child an assistive tool to perform their daily activities. Our clinical experience told us that prosthetic fitting should be initiated at a young age but less is known whether the prostheses can ease the performance of the children’s daily activities. Thus, the study aim was to evaluate the relationship between prosthetic control and the ease of performance in using the prosthesis to perform daily activities.

Method: During their clinic visits, pediatric prosthesis users (n=60, age 3 to 17) were asked to fill in a questionnaire, ‘Prosthetic Upper Extremity Functional Index’,where the child (or the parent if the child is under 6) rated the ease of performance in using the prosthesis to perform 26-38 daily activities. Then the child performed a bimanual activity and an occupational therapist from the clinic (n=6) assessed the child’s prosthetic control with an assessment tool ‘Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control’. Pearson r was used to calculate the correlation between prosthetic control and ease of performance.

Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the capacity for control, wearing pattern and age to predict the ease of performance in PUFI activities.

Results: A strong correlation (Pearson 0.68) was found between the level of prosthetic control (ACMC score) and the ease of performance in using the prosthesis to perform daily activities (PUFI score). The multiple regression model showed that the percentage of variance increased by 26.7% when ACMC scores and wearing pattern were added into the model. When comparing 58ACMC scores and wearing pattern, the ACMC scores have a higher beta value (0.48) than wearing pattern.

Conclusion: The correlation between ease of performance and prosthetic control suggests that a myoelectric prosthesis can ease the performance of their daily activities if the child has a good prosthetic control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. 57-58 p.
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Nursing Science w. Occupational Therapy Focus
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57604OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-57604DiVA: diva2:1094118
Conference
Trent International Prosthetic Symposium 2016, Glasgow, UK, September 28 - October 1, 2016
Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2017-05-09Bibliographically approved

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Abstract, p. 57-58

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  • apa
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