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Physiological reactions to capture in hibernating brown bears
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Applied Ecology and Agricultural Sciences, Hedmark University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, Elverum, Norway.
Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Faculty of Forest Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Applied Ecology and Agricultural Sciences, Hedmark University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, Elverum, Norway.
nstitut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; CNRS UMR 7178, Strasbourg, France.
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2016 (English)In: Conservation Physiology, E-ISSN 2051-1434, Vol. 4, cow061Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human disturbance can affect animal life history and even population dynamics. However, the consequences of these disturbances are difficult to measure. This is especially true for hibernating animals, which are highly vulnerable to disturbance, because hibernation is a process of major physiological changes, involving conservation of energy during a resource-depleted time of year. During the winters of 2011-15, we captured 15 subadult brown bears (Ursus arctos) and recorded their body temperatures (n = 11) and heart rates (n = 10) before, during and after capture using biologgers. We estimated the time for body temperature and heart rate to normalize after the capture event. We then evaluated the effect of the captures on the pattern and depth of hibernation and the day of den emergence by comparing the body temperature of captured bears with that of undisturbed subadult bears (n = 11). Both body temperature and heart rate increased during capture and returned to hibernation levels after 15-20 days. We showed that bears required 2-3 weeks to return to hibernation levels after winter captures, suggesting high metabolic costs during this period. There were also indications that the winter captures resulted in delayed den emergence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016. Vol. 4, cow061
Keyword [en]
Chemical immobilization, ecophysiology, hibernation, research ethics, Ursus arctos
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57929DOI: 10.1093/conphys/cow061ISI: 000401544000001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-57929DiVA: diva2:1106821
Note

Funding Agencies:

Scandinavian Brown Bear Research Project from the Norwegian Environmental Agency  

Swedish Environmental Protection Agency  

Austrian Science Fund  

Swedish Association for Hunting and Wildlife Management 

Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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