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Eating disorders and oral health: a matched case-control study
Department of Clinical Dentistry - Cariology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Stockholm Center for Eating Disorders and Center for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm County Council/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9459-7279
Örebro University Hospital. Örebro County Council.
Department of Clinical Dentistry - Prosthodontics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 120, no 1, 61-68 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to compare the oral health status of patients with eating disorders (EDs), with sex-and age-matched controls, with a view to identify self-reported and clinical parameters that might alert the dental healthcare professional to the possibility of EDs. All patients who entered outpatient treatment in an ED clinic during a 12-month period were invited to participate. Of 65 ED patients who started psychiatric/medical treatment, 54 agreed to participate. Eating disorder patients and controls answered a questionnaire and underwent dental clinical examinations. Multivariate analysis identified significantly higher ORs for ED patients to present dental problems (OR = 4.1), burning tongue (OR = 14.2), dry/cracked lips (OR = 9.6), dental erosion (OR = 8.5), and less gingival bleeding (OR = 1.1) compared with healthy controls. Sensitivity and specificity for the correct classification of ED patients and controls using the five variables was 83% and 79%, respectively. The ED patients with vomiting/binge eating behaviors reported worse perceived oral health (OR = 6.0) and had more dental erosion (OR = 5.5) than those without such behavior. In ED patients with longer duration of the disease, dental erosion was significantly more common. In conclusion, oral health problems frequently affect ED patients, and this needs to be considered in patient assessment and treatment decisions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. Vol. 120, no 1, 61-68 p.
Keyword [en]
dental caries, dental erosion, eating disorders, oral health, saliva
National Category
Dentistry Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58695DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0722.2011.00922.xISI: 000299636700009PubMedID: 22288922Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84856500667OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-58695DiVA: diva2:1127676
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden

Available from: 2017-07-18 Created: 2017-07-18 Last updated: 2017-09-20Bibliographically approved

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