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Risk governance
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Miljösociologiska sektionen)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6735-0011
2017 (English)In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication, Oxford University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Scientific advances, technological development, and changes in risk consciousness have led to stronger demands on society to manage and control various kinds of risks. Risks should be assessed, prevented, controlled, and communicated in order to prevent negative impacts. Risks related to the environment and health are probably some of the most research-dependent examples. It is primarily scientific experts that provide knowledge to authorities, organizations, and citizens about environmental and health risks and thus exert considerable influence on the understanding and management of risk. At the same time, there are actors in society—especially citizen and interest organizations—that question whether risk regulation is reliable and relevant. There are also demands that citizens should have more transparency and control over risk regulation. The current situation is characterized thus by a paradox: Issues relating to environment and health are seen as increasingly expert dependent while citizens simultaneously demand increased influence over them. This development is especially noticeable in the European Union, with its strong emphasis on the rights of citizen and consumers to have access to information about risk and also opportunities to influence their regulation.

In response to this situation, risk governance has been put forward. It refers to a body of ideas for how to more responsibly and efficiently deal with complex risks issues, where there are different interests and standpoints about how to regulate them. Fundamental ideas of risk governance are openness, transparency, participation, inclusion, deliberation, and reflexivity; that experts involved should be open to questioning the situation; should not conceal issues of uncertainty and pluralism (that there exist different legitimate understandings, evaluations, and recommendations); and should be receptive to the input and participation of other stakeholders. This means that risk regulation should no longer be organized into three discrete activities: risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication (aiming at a one-way transfer of knowledge from the regulators to the public).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017.
Keyword [en]
risk, regulation, science, expertise, public inclusion, participation, democracy, responsibility, social amplification of risk, psychometric school of risk analysis, social construction of risk
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59024DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.013.246OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-59024DiVA: diva2:1128737
Available from: 2017-07-27 Created: 2017-07-27 Last updated: 2017-10-04Bibliographically approved

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